Humans came from distant galaxies, new study claims


According to a new study by researchers, humans were formed from matter that flew billions of miles from another galaxy.
Much of the stuff around us and spread throughout our Milky Way is made up of “extragalactic matter”, according to the research.
The study used computer models to find out how the matter around us came to be acquired by our galaxy.
It found that supernova explosions throw out huge amounts of matter from galaxies, spreading it throughout the universe as it is carried on powerful galactic winds.
That means that the same matter that we’re made out of probably began its life in a long distant time and far, far away, before being carried through the universe.
“Given how much of the matter out of which we formed may have come from other galaxies, we could consider ourselves space travelers or extragalactic immigrants,”
Daniel Anglés-Alcázar, a postdoctoral fellow in Northwestern’s astrophysics center, said.
He continued, “It is likely that much of the Milky Way’s matter was in other galaxies before it was kicked out by a powerful wind, traveled across intergalactic space and eventually found its new home in the Milky Way.”
Intergalactic transfer – this movement of matter between galaxies – is a newly identified phenomenon and could fundamentally change our understanding of how galaxies are formed.
“This study transforms our understanding of how galaxies formed from the Big Bang,” said Faucher-Giguère, a co-author of the study.

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